Solara
Solara
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gypsytwo:

dropboxofcuriosities:

Salvador Dali for Playboy Magazine, 1973.

😍😍😍😍😍
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asamanya:

http://blog.freepeople.com/2011/01/just-kids-part-one/
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asamanya:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/reedrunner59/4479889572/
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flowersofthefields:

inneroptics:

CLAIRE MALLETT-love is like a butterfly

so beautiful <3
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myampgoesto11:

Helen Pynor: Liquid Ground

Conceived from her research into the numerous recorded cases of accidental drowning in london’s thames river, Australian artist Helen Pynor has created ‘Liquid Ground’, a series of large-scale photographs which capture various water-buoyed garments expelling human organs from within its floating form. simultaneously haunting and surreal, the unexpected injection of internal organs into an otherwise dreamy underwater scene results in a collection of images that is arresting in both a visual and visceral manner.
Pynor explores new ways in which we can relate to our body’s makeup by rejecting the celebration of gore and horror but drawing from both personal and cultural stories. utilizing phantom forms, the notion of the human body is approached in a highly sensitive and emotional manner despite the morbidity of the subject matter.
via Design Boom

Helen Pynor gained a BSc (Hons) in Biology at Macquarie University majoring in cellular and molecular biology, a BVA at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney majoring in photography, sculpture and installation, and a PhD at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney. In her doctoral thesis, she sought the reconciliation of materialist understandings of the human body with understandings of the body as a culturally-constructed entity, a theme she continues to explore.
Pynor draws extensively from the writings of scientists as well as philosophers of biology, in addition to working with scientists in both collaborative and consultative roles. Her practice is integrally tied to a questioning of the philosophical and material status of human and non-human organisms. (via)
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Helen Pynor: Liquid Ground

Conceived from her research into the numerous recorded cases of accidental drowning in london’s thames river, Australian artist Helen Pynor has created ‘Liquid Ground’, a series of large-scale photographs which capture various water-buoyed garments expelling human organs from within its floating form. simultaneously haunting and surreal, the unexpected injection of internal organs into an otherwise dreamy underwater scene results in a collection of images that is arresting in both a visual and visceral manner.
Pynor explores new ways in which we can relate to our body’s makeup by rejecting the celebration of gore and horror but drawing from both personal and cultural stories. utilizing phantom forms, the notion of the human body is approached in a highly sensitive and emotional manner despite the morbidity of the subject matter.
via Design Boom

Helen Pynor gained a BSc (Hons) in Biology at Macquarie University majoring in cellular and molecular biology, a BVA at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney majoring in photography, sculpture and installation, and a PhD at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney. In her doctoral thesis, she sought the reconciliation of materialist understandings of the human body with understandings of the body as a culturally-constructed entity, a theme she continues to explore.
Pynor draws extensively from the writings of scientists as well as philosophers of biology, in addition to working with scientists in both collaborative and consultative roles. Her practice is integrally tied to a questioning of the philosophical and material status of human and non-human organisms. (via)
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Helen Pynor: Liquid Ground

Conceived from her research into the numerous recorded cases of accidental drowning in london’s thames river, Australian artist Helen Pynor has created ‘Liquid Ground’, a series of large-scale photographs which capture various water-buoyed garments expelling human organs from within its floating form. simultaneously haunting and surreal, the unexpected injection of internal organs into an otherwise dreamy underwater scene results in a collection of images that is arresting in both a visual and visceral manner.
Pynor explores new ways in which we can relate to our body’s makeup by rejecting the celebration of gore and horror but drawing from both personal and cultural stories. utilizing phantom forms, the notion of the human body is approached in a highly sensitive and emotional manner despite the morbidity of the subject matter.
via Design Boom

Helen Pynor gained a BSc (Hons) in Biology at Macquarie University majoring in cellular and molecular biology, a BVA at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney majoring in photography, sculpture and installation, and a PhD at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney. In her doctoral thesis, she sought the reconciliation of materialist understandings of the human body with understandings of the body as a culturally-constructed entity, a theme she continues to explore.
Pynor draws extensively from the writings of scientists as well as philosophers of biology, in addition to working with scientists in both collaborative and consultative roles. Her practice is integrally tied to a questioning of the philosophical and material status of human and non-human organisms. (via)
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Helen Pynor: Liquid Ground

Conceived from her research into the numerous recorded cases of accidental drowning in london’s thames river, Australian artist Helen Pynor has created ‘Liquid Ground’, a series of large-scale photographs which capture various water-buoyed garments expelling human organs from within its floating form. simultaneously haunting and surreal, the unexpected injection of internal organs into an otherwise dreamy underwater scene results in a collection of images that is arresting in both a visual and visceral manner.
Pynor explores new ways in which we can relate to our body’s makeup by rejecting the celebration of gore and horror but drawing from both personal and cultural stories. utilizing phantom forms, the notion of the human body is approached in a highly sensitive and emotional manner despite the morbidity of the subject matter.
via Design Boom

Helen Pynor gained a BSc (Hons) in Biology at Macquarie University majoring in cellular and molecular biology, a BVA at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney majoring in photography, sculpture and installation, and a PhD at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney. In her doctoral thesis, she sought the reconciliation of materialist understandings of the human body with understandings of the body as a culturally-constructed entity, a theme she continues to explore.
Pynor draws extensively from the writings of scientists as well as philosophers of biology, in addition to working with scientists in both collaborative and consultative roles. Her practice is integrally tied to a questioning of the philosophical and material status of human and non-human organisms. (via)
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Helen Pynor: Liquid Ground

Conceived from her research into the numerous recorded cases of accidental drowning in london’s thames river, Australian artist Helen Pynor has created ‘Liquid Ground’, a series of large-scale photographs which capture various water-buoyed garments expelling human organs from within its floating form. simultaneously haunting and surreal, the unexpected injection of internal organs into an otherwise dreamy underwater scene results in a collection of images that is arresting in both a visual and visceral manner.
Pynor explores new ways in which we can relate to our body’s makeup by rejecting the celebration of gore and horror but drawing from both personal and cultural stories. utilizing phantom forms, the notion of the human body is approached in a highly sensitive and emotional manner despite the morbidity of the subject matter.
via Design Boom

Helen Pynor gained a BSc (Hons) in Biology at Macquarie University majoring in cellular and molecular biology, a BVA at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney majoring in photography, sculpture and installation, and a PhD at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney. In her doctoral thesis, she sought the reconciliation of materialist understandings of the human body with understandings of the body as a culturally-constructed entity, a theme she continues to explore.
Pynor draws extensively from the writings of scientists as well as philosophers of biology, in addition to working with scientists in both collaborative and consultative roles. Her practice is integrally tied to a questioning of the philosophical and material status of human and non-human organisms. (via)
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Helen Pynor: Liquid Ground

Conceived from her research into the numerous recorded cases of accidental drowning in london’s thames river, Australian artist Helen Pynor has created ‘Liquid Ground’, a series of large-scale photographs which capture various water-buoyed garments expelling human organs from within its floating form. simultaneously haunting and surreal, the unexpected injection of internal organs into an otherwise dreamy underwater scene results in a collection of images that is arresting in both a visual and visceral manner.
Pynor explores new ways in which we can relate to our body’s makeup by rejecting the celebration of gore and horror but drawing from both personal and cultural stories. utilizing phantom forms, the notion of the human body is approached in a highly sensitive and emotional manner despite the morbidity of the subject matter.
via Design Boom

Helen Pynor gained a BSc (Hons) in Biology at Macquarie University majoring in cellular and molecular biology, a BVA at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney majoring in photography, sculpture and installation, and a PhD at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney. In her doctoral thesis, she sought the reconciliation of materialist understandings of the human body with understandings of the body as a culturally-constructed entity, a theme she continues to explore.
Pynor draws extensively from the writings of scientists as well as philosophers of biology, in addition to working with scientists in both collaborative and consultative roles. Her practice is integrally tied to a questioning of the philosophical and material status of human and non-human organisms. (via)
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Helen Pynor: Liquid Ground

Conceived from her research into the numerous recorded cases of accidental drowning in london’s thames river, Australian artist Helen Pynor has created ‘Liquid Ground’, a series of large-scale photographs which capture various water-buoyed garments expelling human organs from within its floating form. simultaneously haunting and surreal, the unexpected injection of internal organs into an otherwise dreamy underwater scene results in a collection of images that is arresting in both a visual and visceral manner.
Pynor explores new ways in which we can relate to our body’s makeup by rejecting the celebration of gore and horror but drawing from both personal and cultural stories. utilizing phantom forms, the notion of the human body is approached in a highly sensitive and emotional manner despite the morbidity of the subject matter.
via Design Boom

Helen Pynor gained a BSc (Hons) in Biology at Macquarie University majoring in cellular and molecular biology, a BVA at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney majoring in photography, sculpture and installation, and a PhD at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney. In her doctoral thesis, she sought the reconciliation of materialist understandings of the human body with understandings of the body as a culturally-constructed entity, a theme she continues to explore.
Pynor draws extensively from the writings of scientists as well as philosophers of biology, in addition to working with scientists in both collaborative and consultative roles. Her practice is integrally tied to a questioning of the philosophical and material status of human and non-human organisms. (via)
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram
myampgoesto11:

Helen Pynor: Liquid Ground

Conceived from her research into the numerous recorded cases of accidental drowning in london’s thames river, Australian artist Helen Pynor has created ‘Liquid Ground’, a series of large-scale photographs which capture various water-buoyed garments expelling human organs from within its floating form. simultaneously haunting and surreal, the unexpected injection of internal organs into an otherwise dreamy underwater scene results in a collection of images that is arresting in both a visual and visceral manner.
Pynor explores new ways in which we can relate to our body’s makeup by rejecting the celebration of gore and horror but drawing from both personal and cultural stories. utilizing phantom forms, the notion of the human body is approached in a highly sensitive and emotional manner despite the morbidity of the subject matter.
via Design Boom

Helen Pynor gained a BSc (Hons) in Biology at Macquarie University majoring in cellular and molecular biology, a BVA at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney majoring in photography, sculpture and installation, and a PhD at Sydney College of the Arts, The University of Sydney. In her doctoral thesis, she sought the reconciliation of materialist understandings of the human body with understandings of the body as a culturally-constructed entity, a theme she continues to explore.
Pynor draws extensively from the writings of scientists as well as philosophers of biology, in addition to working with scientists in both collaborative and consultative roles. Her practice is integrally tied to a questioning of the philosophical and material status of human and non-human organisms. (via)
My Amp Goes To 11: Twitter | Instagram